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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
with the growing threat from the neighboring syria. 400 troops will join nato forces and stand ready to act if syria intends to unleash chemical weapons. fox's leland vittert is in our middle east bureau. leland, just a few days ago the head of nato said the assad regime is about to collapse. why deploy these troops now? >> reporter: it really has to do with showing solidarity with the turks who are clearly very scared and timing comes a couple days after we learned that the syrians were mixing chemical weapons to possibly use. so this is the united states and nato's way of really get being behind turkey, a close ally saying we support you. the secretary of defense was quick to point out that the patriot missiles are just that, defensive weapons that will be put down along the syrian border to protect syria, protect turkey from attacks by syrian jets or scud missiles that would fly in but that is not exactly the whole story. the patriots could be easily programmed and put in a no-fly zone over northern syria. so far turkey is denying that as is nato saying this is purely defensive move by t
. >> reporter: but kerrie is not totally in sync with obama, and he has had limited intervention in syria, something the froms has resisted. kerry has built deep relationships with many foreign leaders? there are very few people in our country with greater experience over a longer period of time in foreign policy than senator kerry. >> i want to bring in jessica yellin live from the white house. i covered kerr ney 2004 when he was running for president and he was successfully caricatured as someone who was out of touch. give us a behind-the-scenes look at who he is and how he relates to people. >> reporter: well, senator kerry is a statesman, a man who has been working in washington for so many years that it is easy to paint a caricature of him that way. he is a man who has developed a relationship with president obama which is what's meaningful today and here at the white hou house. he is, as kate pointed out, was dispatched by the president not just two times or a number of times during foreign sort of mini crises, but very, very delicate situations and he has successfully eased the way
look at the situation and everything going on in syria, we're waking up to the fact that the regime that replaces the current regime if it falls could be even more anti-american than what we're seeing right now. is there a danger of that in egypt? what if president morsi loses control of the country, what would a replacement look like? >> first of all there will be no morsi losing control and leaving. this is not mubarak. he has a very strong party with him. i am very concerned events in egypt will not be a repeat of the mubarak quitting. it may be a major confrontation. i don't want to use the term civil war but many in egypt are using it if no solution are now. some of the salafists, their allies are armed. armed forces of egypt could take a stand. it is very explosive and dangerous situation inside egypt. lori: in syria as well. let's talk a little more about syria and what is going on there we had reports they're moving sarin gas. what will that be used for? is this looking like a war in itself and really is the whole region on the brink of war? >> it is boiling. what we're witn
with the fiscal cliff in this country to syria being on the brink. secretary of defense leon panetta who is in kuwait today meeting with officials and visiting troops has this to say about syria's escalating crisis. >> continue to make clear to them that they should not, under any means, make use of these chemical weapons against their own population, that that would -- that would producer is use consequences. >> joining me now in studio is retired u.s. army general. it's great to see you and in person, no less. but just so everybody can make that out because i know it was hard for people to hear the secretary there saying we continue to make clear to them they should not under any means make use of these chemical weapons against their own population, that would producer is use consequences. when he's talking about serious consequences what does that mean to the u.s., the stake, the investment we would make militarily. >> i'm sure one thing we're convinced of is that we don't want to take military action to syria. it's a bad idea to commit either naval air power or u.s. air force air pow
. it is a good question. i think the syrians situation is different from the iraq situation. syria reminds me more of the balkans in the 1990's. the internal conflict is horrendous. i think it is different in this respect. not even the syrians want the united states to invade and takeover syria and administrate it. that is not the issue in the case of syria. the issue is whether the united states should supply weapons to factions fighting the regime that are aligned with our interests, and if we do not do this, will the more extreme elements support the radical islamic rebels fighting assad? we want the people to prevail better closer to our interests, yet we are not supporting the materially. reports from serious say there is resentment on this. al qaeda in iraq is now heavily involved in the syrian conflict. one reason is able to do that is we took all our forces out of iraq in 2011. if we had to several thousand forces working with iraqi special operation forces, i believe we could have attenuated the growth of applied it -- of al qaeda in syria. this is a result of the removal of all forc
may be happening in terms of the russian policy toward syria? since we have mentioned iran can we get as far away as syria? >> you can get as far away as syria i hope with some connection. i do appreciate that but the question of syria is of totally sufficient importance so we could address that and thank you for the question. my own gut feeling and i don't know how you guys feel, but the russians have been for the last several weeks, there have been indications of unhappiness with what is going on in syria without a clear sense of what it is that they can can shape it and whether they can do it on their own or with the u.s.. the u.s. has always wanted the russians to be part of that kind of a solution. if there could be one at all. so, if the russians in any way are moving toward the american decision with respect to syria, i think we are all better off for it. okay, another question out there? there is one right up here. and then we will assume that is the last question. >> i wonder if, you all alluded to it and i wonder if we could call the diplomacy -- moving towards the inf negot
: if there is further military action in syria, does that have any impact? guest: the pentagon would need funding for those things. when libya came up, the pentagon does what it is told to do and goes and fights and goes back to congress and says, "now you need to make us whole." in iraq, there were supplemental appropriations. the pentagon will do what it needs to do. it will go back to congress and say, now we need the money to make up for things we spend money on the war. host: this comes from twitter. guest: that is a tough question. i do not know. once you get up to major, lieutenant colonel, you are getting close to that number. they indoor tremendous hardships and often cannot buy a home because they are a mother around so much. there are a lot of sacrifices that goes on. host: scott in woodbridge, virginia. caller: good morning. i am a former marine and a military brat. my father retired from the navy. i have a long history of active duty. i think there is misinformation going on this morning. talk about $800 billion for the wars in the middle east. we spent double that on the stimulus pl
to the bloody civil war in syria and there's new word from the defense secretary leon panetta that the assad regime appears to be slowing its preparations for the possible use of chemical weapons against rebel forces. all this as an activist group inside syria claims they are in full control of a massive military base not far from the country's largest city. national security correspondent jennifer giffin is following it from the pentagon. hi, jennifer. >> reporter: hi, alisyn. the pentagon never officially acknowledged the intelligence reports that the components for sarin nerve gas had been mixed. u.s. officials spoke on background about the intelligence that suggested there were signs it was being readied for use. though they would never give specifics about which syrian base, for instance, they had indications was making the alleged preparations. today defense secretary leon panetta en route to the middle east appeared to backtrack. >> at this point the intelligence is really kind of leveled off. we haven't anything new indicating, you know, any aggressive steps to move forward in that w
60 such "insider" attacks this year. this was the first committed by a woman. in syria, the u.n. envoy to syria met with president bashar al-assad in damascus, but he gave no sign of progress toward halting the civil war. lakhdar brahimi spoke with assad as part of a two-day visit. brahimi was appointed envoy in september, but he's made little apparent headway. the latest visit came a day after opposition groups reported a government air strike on a bakery killed at least 60 people. authorities in india restricted vehicle and railroad travel in new delhi today, in the wake of violent protests over a gang rape. on sunday, police sprayed tear gas and water cannons after crowds began throwing stones and tipping over vehicles. the protesters demanded stronger punishments for crimes against women after a 23-year old woman was attacked on a public bus last week. the victim was thrown from the bus afterward. she remains in critical condition. six arrests have been made. washington was quiet today with the president and congress gone for christmas. but the lack of any fiscal cliff tal
. >> one of the big challenges for the next secretary of state will be syria and our own mccormick spoke with secretary panetta and learned he is sending two missile batteries to turkey including 400 members of the u.s. military to help. does that signal a greater u.s. military involvement? >> what it signals is turkey is a member of nato. i have just come from turturkey. it has very serious issues with the number of refugees coming in. as a nato member we are really have to and want to and are committed to defending turkey so i think it is a 98nato issue and shows a sign we do not want the problems in syria to spread outside the borders. >> if in fact they begin to move chemical weapons, what should the united states and turkey and other country do so? >> people are very concerned about the use of the chemical weapons and also lack of control over them. and i think that there again, there will be -- president obama has made very clear that that is a line. and i think that there probably will be nato looking at it in a variety of -- >> looking at it meaning? >> more d
kerry to make america's top diplomat as the country is leaving two wars but facing issues in syria, iranian and north korea. >> john's entire life has prepared him for his role as the son of a foreign service officer. he has a deep respect for the men and women of the state department. the role they play in advancing our interests and values, the risks that they undertake and the sacrifices they make along with their families. >> john mccain congratulated kerry on his nomination and the republican from arizona says he will consider him as secretary of state but did not promise his support. >> my view on whether senator kerry should be secretary of state will not be based on difference of view. we had differences of view going back to 1991 when he said desert storm will fail but it's my view to carry out responsibilities. >> reporter: kerry kept quiet and hillary clinton wasn't able to make it to the white house at all. she is still recovering from the concussion that is preventing from testifying about what she knew before after and during the deadly attack in benghazi. >> heather:
. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> and welcome back from benghazi to the fighting in syria. there has been a lot of turmoil in the year this year. one of the most serious he threats americans face next year. ryan, nice to see you. >> nice to see you. >> clayton: so, it seems like we may have some repeats in this look down the list of things we've already seen in 2012 which may be extensions into the next year? >> sure, that's true. with the number one being the potential conflict between israel and iran getting hotter, especially because there's presidential elections coming up in iran if you're a middle easterner, what do you do when it's campaign time? you pick fights with israel. >> clayton: and see that continue all year with the u.s. involvement there? >> it's going to have to. because israelis say iran has to have the program delayed by mid summertime. >> clayton: number two? >> there's no good option because you have assad the dictator butchering his people and rebels that are fighting him. they're not controlling what's happening on the ground, that's al-qaeda and the muslim brotherhood so the bloodshed as horrifying as
changed? i just came from a long trip, russia, syria, israel, egypt. here's what happens in what i call a hyperconnected world when you're a columnist now. when i started, i was a reporter in beirut in 1982. all i wanted to do was tell americans something they didn't know from beirut, okay? well, that was pretty easy because, you know, there was no cnn back then. you couldn't really follow the news. there were no bloggers. now when i go abroad to write a column, i just wrote from egypt this morning, what's in my head is i'm not looking to tell just americans something they don't know about egypt, still pretty easy. what i aspire to now is actually to tell egyptians something they don't know about their own country. in other words, my job has changed because i know i have readers there. i have bloggers there. i'm so connected to that audience that it isn't enough for me anymore in the old days just to tell people in chicago something new about egypt. i've now got to tell people in egypt something new about egypt if i want to keep my job. >> exactly. and we ask these questions and make th
of a mutual effort to address the threats of hezbollah patrons iran and syria. by simply designating hezbollah as a terrorist organization and stating the obvious, the europeans could deprive hezbollah to access to millions of dollars in european banks and other financial institutions while making an enormous contribution to regional stability, saving hundreds of lives that would otherwise be hezbollah's future victims. again, i strongly support this kelly resolution and i urge all of my colleagues to do the same. with that, mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from florida reserves. the gentleman from new york, mr. engel is recognized. mr. engel: i rise in strong support of h.res. 834 and yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for such time as he wishes to consume. mr. engel: thank you. this urges the members of -- the nations of europe and the european union to designate hezbollah as a terrorist organization and impose sanctions on it. we know from our experiences with iran that sanctio
that latest on syria. in afghanistan, the pentagon has tracked a slight rise in afghan attacks. we showed you a report yesterday in "usa today" that deaths in afghanistan have gone down. we have about a minute left here. let me just read another tweet -- let me give you the latest headlines on health care. here's u.s. news section of the wall street journal. then yesterday, six states were approved by the centers for medicaid and medicare services on track under federal guidelines to operate in an exchange during open enrollment next october apparen. up next, we are going to turn our attention to the fiscal cliff with jim doyle and get a business perspective on that. later on, looking at the different aspects of the fiscal cliff talks. a closer look at domestic spending. we will be right back. >> ♪ [video clip] >> give it to him hard. >> he is not safe on that bus. >> i've been on that bus. they are just as good as gold. >> all of us in this country are starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this phenomenon that so many of us have experienced in one way or a
on in this piece in "usa today" -- harder choices loom. syria being a more intractable problem than libya. a tougher stance with china through the a share rebalancing . is now the time to me sure a firmer line does not lead to another war. writer a lot that the lays out in his piece. grace from alabama, good morning. caller: good morning. i have a question about benghazi. nobody has said anything like this. it seems to me, the president would get on the phone with the president of the other country and say, "please help us save our people." the in the u.s. help support the efforts of the people to get rid of gaddafi? why did obama or hillary clinton get on the phone and call the president of libya and say, "you owe us. san whenever you have to save our people." i believe the local forces went in after it was over and our people were dead. to didn't somebody jawbone, get them in there to help? host: you can talk about any topic you like. joel florida, what is on your mind. caller: you were talking about afghanistan. one of the main reasons we are over there is to keep the poppy plants grow
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)